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Over 100 volunteers help plant the Sandy Delta

Photo courtesy of Brighton West
Around 130 volunteers planted 800 trees and shrubs at the Sandy Delta in an effort to restore native forest vegetation.  The Sandy River Delta is undergoing multiple methods of restoration, including invasive species removal, native plantings, wetland protection fencing, and the removal of the Sandy Delta Dam. These combined restoration effots benefit the native habitat, wildlife and users of the Sandy Delta.

With the goal of restoring the native oak woodland forest ecosystem, we planted trees and shrubs on November 9, 2013. This event was in partnership with the Watershed Council, Friends of Trees, Ash Creek Forest Management, the US Forest Service, FedEx, as well as volunteers from the local community, Girl Scouts, Reynolds High School, and College Possible. Volunteers came out in full force to plant natives, mulch, and place protective tubing around our new seedlings.

Logan Lauvray (Friends of Trees) and Steve Wise (Sandy RIver Basin Watershed Council) addressing volunteers prior to planting
A Friends of Trees crew leader instructing Girl Scout volunteers the proper planting technique
Volunteers planted around 800 trees and shrubs
Trees were protected from trampling and grazing by blue tubing
Representatives from the Watershed Council, Friends of Trees, Ash Creek Forest Management, FedEx, Friends of the Columbia Gorge, and Reynolds High School
The day's work is visible with freshly mulched and tubed trees

This is the first step toward more natural vegetation on the Sandy Delta. Projects will continue in the years to come, and our next public planting event will be February 8, 2014. Additional efforts are being made to control invasive species such as Himalayan Blackberry, which prevents regeneration of the forest by out-competing understory plants and seedlings.

Funding for this project comes from East Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District, the US Forest Service, the Jubitz Family Foundation, PGE’s Habitat Fund, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board.  You can read more about this project in an article by the Gresham Outlook.  Photos are courtesy of Brighton West at Friends of Trees and Bill Weiler at the Sandy River Basin Watershed Council.

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